Lessons I learned from my summer practise (or an ode to doctors I worked with)…

As stated in my previous post, I approached the idea of summer practise in Nigeria with quite a bit of anxiety (one morning I actually hid in my sister’s bathroom… the entire why of that deserves its own post).. So, I was actually surprised I ended up enjoying it.

And this is all because of the doctors I met/was assigned to while there :

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Summer Clinical Practice in Nigeria

There’s this cool thing we get to know in medical school, and it goes by different names, but for the purpose of this post, it’s going to be called : “clinical training”.

Summer break, rather than laze around or hang out with friends (though you can be certain we find tine for that), we spend managed hours in the hospital, assigned in various departments to different doctors, hopefully acquiring practical skills/knowledge and brushing up on what we had learned so far.

The system may vary from school to school, but because medicine is medicine, the formula stays fairly the same.

However, for the first time, I would be practicing at home, in Nigeria.

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Having Tea in TB Class 

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It was the second cycle of the semester as 4th year students (*dances because I’m getting closer to the end*), and it was to be “Phthisiopulmonology”, which is a fancy word for “Study of Tuberculosis”.
We had been warned that the teacher was racist and mean, and truth be told, I didn’t warm up to her the first day. Come Monday morning, she came into class smiling and welcoming, so I relaxed.. See, she isn’t so bad…

Then came the…..talks.
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#MedicalSchool Chronicles : 1st Week of Summer Practice

I just finished my third year of medical school, which meant a lot to me, but especially these two things :

  •   I’d written (and passed, thank God) five of the most grueling exams I’ve ever taken on, and
  • I get to begin summer practice (as we’re 3rd/4th year students, it’s basically nursing training)

The practicals consist of two “parts” : surgery and propaedeutics, with each taking two weeks. My group and I started off with Surgery, and luckily we were all assigned to the same hospital.

W e got zero time to recover from exam fever, and having been sent two pdf files detailing instructions concerning addresses and such of our practise in Russian language, and having to decode the whole thing, which really wasn’t a bother, but it did give a sense of foreboding to the coming events..

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